FORMULA1

The circuits of the past, some monuments abandoned by Formula 1

The calendar of the first World Championship in Formula 1, that of 1950, contained seven grands prix. Seven circuits, therefore, three of which are incredibly still used (Silverstone, Montecarlo, Monza), one... almost (Spa-Francorchamps), two completely abandoned (Bremgarten, Reims).

Here are some of the tracks on which the Formula 1 has left traces of its history, but which are no longer part, for various reasons, of the calendar.

Let's start with the first two decades.

Browse the gallery of abandoned Formula 1 circuits.

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The circuits of the past, some monuments abandoned by Formula 1
In this photo gallery we reveal some of the tracks on which the Formula 1 has left traces of its history, but which are no longer part, for various reasons, of the calendar.
Stats F1
Bremgarten (Switzerland)
Bremgarten was a beautiful circuit. Difficult, very fast, characterized by ups and downs and a variety of curves that cannot be found on other tracks. He was on the outskirts of Bern and had already claimed several victims in cars and motorcycles before he entered the official calendar. Its abandonment was not caused by fatal accidents, but by the decision of the Swiss state to ban motor racing on national territory. Decision taken in 1955 after the accident in Le Mans, when during the 24 hours a contact between two cars caused a real disaster, with 84 dead and 120 injured
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Reims (France)
The first of the venues of the French Grand Prix was, in fact, nothing more than a series of straights in the middle of the countryside connected by a few right-angle curves. It was abandoned by Formula 1 in '66, after 11 editions and a last race finished by Jack Brabham to the crazy, for those times, hourly average of 220 km per hour.
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Grand Prix of Pescara (Italy)
On a used circuit, before and after, only for races with prototype cars, a grand prix of Formula 1 in its own way was held on August 18, 1957. The first and only Grand Prix of Pescara.  This is a historic event because the race took place on the longest track ever used for a race valid for the world championship. The circuit in Abruzzo measured the amazing length of 25.579 km.
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AVUS (Germany)
Of all the strange places visited by the Grand Prix in the 50s and 60s, the AVUS is certainly the most... hallucinatory. Just to clarify, AVUS was the first European motorway and is located near Berlin.  When it was decided to run there, nothing came to mind but to follow it in both directions. At one end the direction was reversed by turning around a very slow hairpin bend. On the other hand, one of the most dangerous curves ever seen was used, a parabolic inclined at 45 ° that was traveled in full with understandable risks. Fortunately, AVUS was only raced one Grand Prix, in '59.
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Sebring in Florida, or Riverside in California (USA)
Only one attempt for each, failing. Sebring is still open to American races, Riverside even no longer exists. It would arrive in '61 to replace them the much more successful circuit of the state of New York of Watkins Glen, which remained on the calendar as the site of the Grand Prix for fifteen consecutive seasons.
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